måndag 27 maj 2013

Federal Drug Administration approves use of the Mark of the Beast for medical Patients...


Federal Drug Administration approves use of the Mark of the Beast for medical Patients...

And he shall make all, both little and great, rich and poor, freemen and bondmen, to have a character in their right hand or on their foreheads: And that no man might buy or sell, but he that hath the character, or the name of the beast, or the number of his name.Carlos Altamirano ismplanted with the VeriChip, a microchip that is used to confirm everything from health history to identity in this July 17, 2003 file photo , in Mexico City. Security has reached the subcutaneous level for Mexico's Attorney General Rafael Macedo de la Concha and at least 160 people in his office- they have been implanted with microchips that get them access to secure areas of their headquarters.(Apocalypse Chapter 13: 16-17)
Medical milestone or privacy invasion? A tiny computer chip approved Wednesday for implantation in a patient's arm can speed vital information about a patient's medical history to doctors and hospitals. But critics warn that it could open new ways to imperil the confidentiality of medical records.
The Food and Drug Administration said Wednesday that Applied Digital Solutions of Delray Beach, Fla., could market the VeriChip, an implantable computer chip about the size of a grain of rice, for medical purposes.
With the pinch of a syringe, the microchip is inserted under the skin in a procedure that takes less than 20 minutes and leaves no stitches. Silently and invisibly, the dormant chip stores a code that releases patient-specific information when a scanner passes over it.
Think UPC code. The identifier, emblazoned on a food item, brings up its name and price on the cashier's screen. At the doctor's office the codes stamped onto chips, once scanned, would reveal such information as a patient's allergies and prior treatments, speeding care.
The microchips have already been implanted in 1 million pets. But the chip's possible dual use for tracking people's movements - as well as speeding delivery of their medical information to emergency rooms - has raised alarm.
2010-08-01 11:10

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